PRIDE March in the Philippines

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History of PRIDE March in the Philippines

The first PRIDE March in the Philippines

Open Table Metropolitan Community Church (MMC) is an inclusive Christian “woke church” with a special ministry for LGBTQIA individuals. They perform same-sex “holy unions” and have transgender and women pastors.

MMC made history by organizing what can be considered the first PRIDE March in the Philippines on June 26, 1994.

Facing Opposition

The PRIDE March celebration in the Philippines has faced opposition from mainstream Christian movements. However, there are liberal lawmakers and notable celebrities who have become prominent faces of the LGBTQIA+ movement in the country.

Liberal Senators Hontiveros and De Lima, as well as celebrities Vice Ganda, Izza Calzado, Angelina Mead King, Paolo Ballesteros, Myrtle Sarrosa, and Janella Salvador, have shown their support and advocacy for LGBTQIA+ rights.

At the center of it is the SOGIE Bill, opposed by the majority of lawmakers.

Despite the challenges, these individuals have been instrumental in raising awareness and pushing for equality and acceptance in the Philippines.

A Trailblazing Movement

Following the inaugural event, the Pride March in the Philippines grew in scale and significance with each passing year. LGBTQIA+ activists, organizations, and allies rallied together, fueling the momentum for change and acceptance.

Uniting for Equality and Expanding the Movement

The PRIDE March became a platform to amplify voices, raise awareness, and advocate for the rights and welfare of the LGBTQIA+ community. It served as a symbol of unity, solidarity, and strength.

The marchers carried placards, banners, and signs bearing powerful messages of love, acceptance, and equal rights. Over the years, the annual celebration paved the way for numerous LGBTQIA+ initiatives, support networks, and safe spaces.

Celebrating Progress and Embracing Diversity

Today, the PRIDE March in the Philippines continues to be an annual celebration that transcends boundaries and embraces diversity.

Ultimately, advocates seek acceptance in society, but for conservative religious Filipinos, what they want is acceptance of what the Bible calls sin.

The Metro Manila PRIDE

In 2021, the Metro Manila Pride, or MM PRIDE, was registered with the Philippine Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) as a non-profit organization.

Each year, MM PRIDE develop multiple programs, from cultural events and educational discussions to the annual PRIDE March and Festival.

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